FL@33

multi-disciplinary
design studio

FL@33 | FLAT33.COM (v.2–v.2.5)
Launched in September 2003 this website version exceeded all our expectations. Version 2 – even considering all it's little tweaks over the years – was designed at a time when 15"/800 x 600px screen resolution was still the norm and 17" resolution was pushing it. Comprehensive portfolio websites were still a rarity, blogs were not mainstream yet, Facebook, Twitter and even tools such as Indexibit were not around yet. Our current studio logo was not even developed yet in 2003. Oh – and nobody in the studio was married yet nor had kids.
___ A time in other words were we could not possibly have anticipated that flat33.com's v.2 website structure and design would serve us truly well for over 9 years.
___ The site had different colour schemes over the years starting with orange/silver, followed by it's longest lasting colour combination – a gold/silver/patina variant – only succeeded by a purple/silver/turquoise version that is still online in our archive. (No guarantee though – that it still works as smoothly in today's browsers as it did back in 2001...) The lined paper background pattern has always been the visual link between FL@33's initial stationery and the studio's version 1 of the portfolio website.

FLAT33.COM (v.2) PRESS CLIPPING
With the exception of a few engaging examples, Adrian Shaughnessy finds little to break the monotony on a trawl through design consultancy websites.
___ Any survey of trends in designers' websites has to include the 'Shoreditch tendency'. You know the sort of thing: groovy sites oozing with Flash-animation and dysfunctional typography. Prime examples are the online homes of Hi-Res and FL@33. These are visually arresting sites, but I suspect they appeal as much to design students and design groupies as to potential clients. Why else would designers put so much effort into lovingly categorising their appearances in the design press or on the global lecture circuit? (...) Wide of the Bookmark, by Adrian Shaughnessy, Design Week, 10 February 2005

 

 

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